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behavior

This tag is associated with 17 posts

Principles of NeuroMarketing

Neuromarketing is “the systematic collection and interpretation of neurological and neurophysiological insights about individuals using different protocols, allowing researchers to explore nonverbal and unconscious physiological responses to various stimuli for the purposes of market research,” according to the Neuromarketing Science & Business Association. In other words, it’s how our brain responds to marketing stimuli from both … Continue reading

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Nine Tips to be Successful at Selling Anything!

Let the buyer TRUST you. (To buy is to trust.) Establish trust through honesty and credibility early with the buyer. Let the buyer TALK 90% of the time. (It is remarkable how many sales people fail at this!) Switch from TELL mode to ASK mode. Keep asking questions until the buyer is tired of talking… … Continue reading

How to Create Products that Facilitate Long-Term Behavior Change

Understand the user’s mindset: It is especially important to understand the mindset that individuals are in, as it shapes how they respond to your application. These different facets of self can be selectively activated, and shape our behavior in different contexts. Similarly, if a product can change how a person sees herself (i.e., her self-concept), … Continue reading

Six Blazingly Obvious Aspects of Human Behavior for Product or Interaction Design

Excerpt From: Wendel, Stephen. “Designing for Behavior Change.” O’Reilly Media, 2013-11-05.  1. Easier really is better The easier something is to do (i.e., the less mental and physical effort required from the perspective of the user), the more likely the user is to do it. Psychologists study these as “channel factors,” behavioral economists talk about … Continue reading

Four Steps to Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

From: “ HOW TO KEEP YOUR RESOLUTIONS  By KATHERINE L. MILKMAN and KEVIN G. VOLPP, January 3, 2014, NY Times     1. Make a concrete plan. When you do so, you both embed your intentions firmly in memory (which reduces forgetting) and make it harder to postpone good behavior, since doing so requires breaking an explicit commitment to … Continue reading

Human Behavior and the Unconscious Mind

extracts from John A. Bargh, Scientific American, (Jan 2014) 32-37 The ability to regulate our own behavior depends on more than genes, temperament, or social support. It also hinges on our capacity to identify and overcome automatic impulses and emotions. “Snap” (subconscious) judgements of others allow us to make decisions about how we will act … Continue reading

Twelve Rules for Authenticity

1. Focus on bolstering your self-respect and on loving others. 2. When people occassionally commit self-defeating or anti-social acts, help or guide them away from them. 3. When things are not the way you want them to be, either strive to change the conditions that foster them or temporarily accept that is the way things are. … Continue reading

Twelve Irrational Things We Do (and What We Can Do About It)

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT)  was created and developed by the American psychotherapist and psychologist Albert Ellis. REBT is a practical, action-oriented approach to coping with problems and enhancing personal growth. It places a good deal of its focus on the present: on currently-held attitudes, painful emotions and maladaptive behaviors that can sabotage a fuller experience of life. … Continue reading

How to be a Better Parent

Ten Tips on Becoming a Better Parent: 1) Love and affection. You support and accept the child, are physically affectionate, and spend quality one-on-one time together. 2. Stress management. You take steps to reduce stress for yourself and your child, practice relaxation techniques and promote positive interpretations of events. 3. Relationship skills. You maintain a healthy relationship with … Continue reading

Methods for Creating Long-Term Behavior Change

Health Belief Model The health belief model stipulates that a person’s health-related behavior depends on the person’s perception of four critical areas: the severity of a potential illness, the person’s susceptibility to that illness, the benefits of taking a preventive action, and the barriers to taking that action. The model also incorporates cues to action … Continue reading