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neuroscience

This tag is associated with 11 posts

Principles of NeuroMarketing

Neuromarketing is “the systematic collection and interpretation of neurological and neurophysiological insights about individuals using different protocols, allowing researchers to explore nonverbal and unconscious physiological responses to various stimuli for the purposes of market research,” according to the Neuromarketing Science & Business Association. In other words, it’s how our brain responds to marketing stimuli from both … Continue reading

Ways to Stay In Control for Long-Term Behavior Change

Adapted from: “How Successful People Stay Productive and In Control” https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20141110142734-50578967-how-successful-people-stay-productive Forgive Yourself A vicious cycle of failing to control oneself followed by feeling intense self-hatred and disgust is common in attempts at self-control. These emotions typically lead to over-indulging in the offending behavior. When you slip up, it is critical that you forgive yourself and move … Continue reading

Neuroplasticity – Lessons from “The Brain that Changes Itself” Norman Doige

Excerpt From: Norman Doidge, M.D. “The Brain That Changes Itself.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewBook?id=357928935   Brain Maps And The Plastic Brain Spatial reasoning is necessary for forming a mental map of where things are. We use this kind of reasoning to organize our desks or remember where we have left our keys. Kinesthetic perception allows us to … Continue reading

Human Behavior and the Unconscious Mind

extracts from John A. Bargh, Scientific American, (Jan 2014) 32-37 The ability to regulate our own behavior depends on more than genes, temperament, or social support. It also hinges on our capacity to identify and overcome automatic impulses and emotions. “Snap” (subconscious) judgements of others allow us to make decisions about how we will act … Continue reading

What is Consciousness?

Notes from Charlie Rose Special on Consciousness Patricia Churchland: The historical description of consciousness started with Descartes: – Physical body – Non-physical soul It is the soul that has creativity, perception and reason, Descartes argued. In the 1800s, Von Helmholz postulated that: – It is all physical (the brain) – otherwise the law of conservation … Continue reading

Ten Psychological States you may have experienced but didn’t have a name for

1. Dysphoria Often used to describe depression in psychological disorders, dysphoria is general state of sadness that includes restlessness, lack of energy, anxiety, and vague irritation. It is the opposite of euphoria, and is different from typical sadness because it often includes a kind of jumpiness and some anger. You have probably experienced it when … Continue reading

The SCARF theory of NeuroLeadership

Neuroscience has shown that the brain makes 5 threat vs. reward evaluations every second. These evaluations are based on five key parameters, sometimes called SCARF:  SCARF S – Status C – Certainty A – Autonomy R – Relatedness F – Fairness   Consider a manager walking into a room full of her subordinates. Within the … Continue reading

How to Create a Daily Habit – Any Habit!

Pick one (1) habit only that you wish to create. Do NOT set a goal that you wish this habit to accomplish. (That will come later!) For example: A habit is “exercising more”. A goal is “running a marathon.” Decide the MINIMUM that you wish to do daily to inculcate this habit. Keep it easy! … Continue reading

How we learn

How We Learn  Highlights from David Brooks opus ‘the Social Animal’ 1. Decision Making How does the brain make decisions? e.g. about what to learn and how to learn it. According to research summarized by Brooks, the brain is an ecosystem constantly measuring the social landscape. We subconsciously form goals, ambitions, dreams and desires every … Continue reading

Seven Behavioral Heuristics That Cause Us To Make Irrational Decisions

Priming – a reminder of a feature tees up behaviors reminiscent of that feature (asking students to read words that vaguely have to do with age causes them to walk slower) Anchoring – behaviors cluster around a comparison to supposed “norms” (showing $149, $30 and $10 bottles of wine cause people to buy $30 bottle … Continue reading